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October 2017
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November 2017
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Get Bloody Serious! in Surry Hills
Date: 03 Nov - 03 Nov

A workshop on how to make hep C history – from prevention to cure! Hepatitis NSW are delivering this interactive work

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December 2017
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International Volunteer Day
Date: 05 Dec - 05 Dec

International Volunteer Day (IVD) is celebrated each year on 5 December and was established by the United Nations Genera

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January 2018
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February 2018
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March 2018
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April 2018
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May 2018
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June 2018
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July 2018
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August 2018
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September 2018
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Online pharmacies

Pages tagged Treatment

Online pharmacies

Prescriptions (scripts) for the new hepatitis C treatment drugs are usually filled at community chemist shops but they can also be filled through some online pharmacies. Look for your local community chemist shop by using our online Directory… Click here to open our online directory and look for your local GPs and chemist shops>>   While online chemists might not be as secure as customers picking up their treatment drugs from a local pharmacy, they will be very helpful for people who live in parts of NSW with no pharmacies who fill these scripts.   You will need to fill in their details online phone the pharmacy post the prescription to the address provided on the website. The pharmacy must first receive the prescription. Once they receive the script, they will place the order for the medicine, which may arrive within 1-2 days (sometimes this might take up to a week) and then the medicine is delivered to you through Australia Post.   Try the following online pharmacies… https://www.chemistwarehouse.com.au/ https://www.epharmacy.com.au https://www.Pharmacyonline.com.au http://www.pharmacydirect.com.au/ http://www.yourchemistshop.com.au/ http://www.royyoungchemist.com.au/ If the treatment drugs don’t appear... Read more.

The Champion #26 Professional

This issue New Hepatitis C Drugs – PBAC Update New options for people living with hepatitis B to get prescriptions filled Parliament Releases The Silent Disease Report   New Hepatitis C Drugs – PBAC Update As regular readers of The Champion would be aware, a number of hepatitis C drugs will be considered at the July meeting of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC). This includes Viekira Pak (paritaprevir with ritonavir, ombitasvir and dasabuvir), which is an interferon-free combination treatment for hepatitis C genotype 1. Thank you very much to everyone who lodged a submission to the PBAC calling for these drugs to be approved – and to our partner organisations across the sector for  getting on board the push for Equal Treatment Access to these potentially life-saving new treatments. It is expected that the recommendations from the July meeting will be announced in late August – and Hepatitis NSW will provide an update on the outcome via social media, and through The Champion. The other hepatitis C drugs which have already been recommended by the PBAC – sofosbuvir, sofosbuvir/ledipasvir, and daclatasvir – remain the subject of... Read more.

The Champion #26 Community

This issue New Hepatitis C Drugs – PBAC Update New options for people living with hepatitis B to get prescriptions filled Parliament Releases The Silent Disease Report New Hepatitis C Drugs – PBAC Update As regular readers of The Champion would be aware, a number of hepatitis C drugs will be considered at the July meeting of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC). This includes Viekira Pak (paritaprevir with ritonavir, ombitasvir and dasabuvir), which is an interferon-free combination treatment for hepatitis C genotype 1. Thank you very much to everyone who lodged a submission to the PBAC calling for these drugs to be approved – and to our partner organisations across the sector for  getting on board the push for Equal Treatment Access to these potentially life-saving new treatments. It is expected that the recommendations from the July meeting will be announced in late August – and Hepatitis NSW will provide an update on the outcome via social media, and through The Champion. The other hepatitis C drugs which have already been recommended by the PBAC – sofosbuvir, sofosbuvir/ledipasvir, and daclatasvir – remain the subject... Read more.

Campaigns

The prevalence of hepatitis C in people with mental illness is higher than it is in the general population, but recent medical advances present an opportunity to change this. The Change of Mind campaign encourages people who live with hep C and who also experience mental health issues to learn why now is an excellent time to be treated for hep C. Hepatitis NSW is working with organisations from across the sector to promote three specific messages: Hep C is higher among people with diagnosed mental health issues The good news is that hep C can be easily treated, and cured Even more good news: curing hep C can have multiple health benefits, including mental health benefits New Direct Acting Antiviral (DAA) drugs with very high cure rates (95%) can now cure hep C in as little as 8-12 weeks. These DAAs are all tablets and have minimal side-effects – they replaced previous hep C drugs that caused or exacerbated mental health side-effects, including depression and psychosis. Out-dated views about hep C treatment mean that people living with both hep... Read more.

Treating hep C FAQ

  Can I get treatment for hep C? Yes, very good new treatments are now available to everyone with hep C in Australia (over 18 years) who has a Medicare Card. These treatments give a 95% chance of cure (getting rid of your hep C).   Do I have to pay for treatment? If you have a Medicare Card, the actual medicines are free but you will be charged the usual co-payment paid for a prescription. This is currently $38.30 per month for general patients and $6.20 per month if you have a Health Care Card.   Will I get side effects from hep C treatment? The new treatments are well tolerated with only minor side effects. Ibavyr (ribavirin) can involve anaemia, fatigue, headache, skin irritation and insomnia. Pregnancy must be strictly avoided during treatment and some time afterwards. Talk to your doctor, or phone the Hepatitis Infoline.   Does treatment interfere with other drugs I am taking? Sometimes one medicine we take interferes with other medicines, or with recreational drugs (including alcohol). A useful website that lists all these... Read more.

Hep B treatment

Not everyone with hep B needs treatment. The current treatments for hep B aim to stop the virus being active and multiplying. Treatment aims to decrease the amount of the virus in your blood (your “viral load”) so that your immune system can make the virus inactive. The amount of virus in your blood will depend on which phase of the infection you are in, so you may need treatment at some times and not others. Most people who start treatment for chronic hep B will take their medications on a long-term basis. Treatment cannot currently cure hep B: the goal is to control the virus by making it inactive.   In Australia there are a number of drugs used to treat hep B: Entecavir (Baraclude®) and Tenofovir (Viread®) are two newer antiviral medications which are generally more potent (stronger). They are also taken orally, usually very well-tolerated (unlikely to cause side effects), and the virus is much less likely to become resistant to them with prolonged use. Pegylated interferon boosts the body’s immune system and changes the virus’ ability... Read more.

Hep C Testing

To find out if you have hep C you may need to have two different blood tests. The first test is called the hep C antibody test. This test shows whether or not you have ever been exposed to the hep C virus. A hep C antibody test does not show whether or not you are living with hep C. This is because this test does not look for the hep C virus itself, it looks for the antibodies that your body produces after you have been exposed to the hep C virus. Everyone who is exposed to hep C has an initial 6-month infection where their body tries to get rid of it. This is called the acute phase of infection. Your body produces antibodies – part of your immune system – and hep C antibodies can generally be detected three months after you have been exposed to hep C. One in four people who are exposed to the hep C virus will clear the virus naturally within the first six months. Even if you clear the virus, you... Read more.

Get treatment support – Hep Connect

Hep Connect is a free telephone support service for people in NSW   “Throughout my 24 week treatment she was the only person I had contact with that had hep C….it meant so much to me to actually speak to another person who has been affected by hep C.”   To get support from someone who’s been through hep C treatment, you can call the Hepatitis Infoline 1800 803 990 and ask to speak with a peer worker, or email info@hep.org.au   Hep Connect is for: people affected by hep C, partners and carers of people affected by hep C, people thinking about starting hep C treatment, people going through hep C treatment.   A Hep Connect peer worker can: understand what you’re going through, listen to concerns around starting treatment, talk about tests needed before starting treatment, share with you how they coped going through treatment, be there for you to talk to on a weekly basis.   People who access Hep Connect say they feel less isolated as a result.   This page was last update 30 June 2017.

Hepatitis Infoline

1800 803 990   Our Hepatitis Infoline offers info, support and referrals across NSW. It’s a free, confidential and non-judgemental call from landlines and from prisons. “I felt a lot better after talking to someone. There aren’t that many people to talk to about hep C so this was great, actually.”   Would you like to use a free telephone interpreter? Call TIS (Translating and Interpreting Service) on 131 450 Ask them to call Hepatitis NSW on 1800 803 990   We can also answer questions via email. You can call or email for: • Up to date, accurate information about hep B or C • A supportive environment to talk over your experiences of living with hep B or C • Referral details for services such as liver clinics or doctors • Support for individual advocacy • A free information pack on hepatitis You can call or email if you: • Are someone who has hep B or C • Are a friend, partner, family-member or workmate of someone who has hep B or C • Think you might have been exposed to hep B or... Read more.

Pregnancy

  Hep C is unlikely to affect your reproductive health. Many women with hep C fall pregnant and have children. If you develop cirrhosis, however, you may find it difficult to fall pregnant or be more likely to have a miscarriage. If you are living with hep C and you’re pregnant or planning to fall pregnant then one of the biggest concerns you might have right now you is whether or not your baby will contract hep C. There is a chance that your baby will be born with hep C. This chance is around 4-6 percent. This means that out of one hundred babies whose mums have hep C, about five of the babies will have hep C. If your baby is born with hep C then there is a one-in-four chance that they will clear the virus naturally. That means that 25 percent of babies born with hep C do not develop chronic hep C. It is recommended that babies born to women with hep C are tested. With babies, a PCR test can be done after 8... Read more.