Recruiting now

We’re always looking for people with lived experience of hep C to become paid peer workers at Hepatitis NSW. The work is rewarding, well-paid, often only a couple of hours a week, and an exciting way to be part of making hep C history.

You don’t need any qualifications, expertise, or special skills to be a peer worker in the Live Hep C Free program. All you need is to have lived with hep C, be passionate about helping others, have good communication skills, and be reliable. We’ll provide all the training, support, and skills you need to be a great peer worker.

Our peer workers work in partnership with healthcare workers in methadone clinics, homelessness services, mental health services, residential rehabs, and other sites to help people access the hepatitis healthcare they need.

We’re in great need of people with lived experience of hep C in the following areas:

  • South West Sydney – e.g. Liverpool, Bankstown, Fairfield, Campbelltown, and surrounds
  • Western Sydney – e.g. Parramatta, Mt Druitt, Blacktown, and surrounds
  • North Sydney – e.g. Northern Beaches areas, Manly, St Leonards, Chatswood, Ryde, Hornsby, and surrounds.
  • Southern NSW – anywhere from Eden to Bega to Queanbeyan to Goulbourn

Even if you don’t live in one of these areas, please still get in touch; we’re always looking for more people to join the team.

This is a paid casual role and we’d love you to join our team of over 20 peer workers all over NSW. You don’t need any qualifications so please get in touch if you’ve ever lived with hep C and want to help others get cured and get the healthcare they need.

 

Live healthy, live better, live hep C free

The Live Hep C Free program is all about making it as simple, as quick, and as barrier-free for people living with or at-risk of hep C to access hep C healthcare. We partner peer workers with healthcare workers (such as hep C nurses) to offer hep C testing, treatment, and healthcare on-site at key services that people are already visiting. These 3 to 4-hour engagements might be at places such as methadone clinics, homelessness services, mental health services, needle and syringe program outlets, and residential rehabs.

The important role peer workers play is engaging with people at these services and encouraging them to see the on-site nurse about hep C. Peer workers also help clients to navigate the health system, to understand hep C, and to access the healthcare they need.

We see our peer workers as experts on living with hep C and our partner nurses as experts on hep C healthcare. Together, peer workers and hep C nurses are helping hundreds of people across NSW access testing, treatment and healthcare for hep C.

Peer workers play a vital role in the efforts to eliminate hep C as a public health threat by 2028 and The Live Hep C Free program has been enormously successful in working towards this goal. Since the start of the Live Hep C Free program in 2018 to the end of 2019:

  • 221 service visits were made by peer workers to key services across NSW
  • 3,896 people were engaged with about hep C and encouraged to access hep C healthcare
  • 1,276 people then saw the on-site partner nurse
  • 814 hep C screens were done (blood tests, FibroScan)
  • 123 people accessed hep C treatment
  • 479 people were referred onward for further healthcare (e.g. for cirrhosis, hepatitis B)

We strongly believe in making hep C testing and treatment as easy and simple as possible to access so that people have the opportunity to live healthier, to live better, and to live hep C free.

If Live Hep C Free sounds like something you would be interested in, for yourself or your clients, please contact Kyle on 02 8217 7707 or use this confidential form to get in touch with us.

RECRUITING NOW

Commencing late January – early February 2019
We’re looking for people with lived experience of hep C to become community media speakers with Hepatitis NSW. The work is rewarding, paid, and an exciting way to be part of making hep C history. The role of the speaker is to increase awareness of hep C treatment and cure.

Community Media Speakers also need to be aware that their name and face will be used, and that they may be seen by friends, family and associates.

If this sounds like something that would interest you, please contact us using the confidential form below.

PUTTING A FACE TO HEP C CURE

The project aims to put a human face to hep C treatment and encourage others living with the virus to seek cure.

Hepatitis NSW’s Community Media Speakers are casual workers who have experience of living with hepatitis C and of cure through the new direct acting antivirals, or, DAAs.

A Community Media Speaker should be available to discuss, with a range of media outlets aspects of living with viral hepatitis and cure/treatment as a personal experience.

If found suitable, speakers will be:

  • Paid as sessional (casual) workers.
  • Given media training.
  • Offered at least two/three media engagements within the year (including at least one interview for internal Hepatitis NSW communications projects).
  • Provided with other support, supervision and reimbursement as required.

If being a Hepatitis C Community Media Speaker sounds like something you would be interested in, please contact:

Grace Crowley, Community Media Speakers Project Officer
phone: 02 9332 1853

Or use this confidential form:

Hepatitis NSW is committed to the ideal of equal opportunity in employment and will not discriminate against applicants or employees on the grounds of race, gender, physical or intellectual impairment, sexuality, marital status, religious belief, political conviction, viral hepatitis or other health status or on any other ground that is not relevant in determining the best applicant for any position. People with viral hepatitis are encouraged to apply, as are people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds.

We are required by our funder, NSW Health, to carry out a national criminal record check for all new employees, casual staff, and volunteers on our Board of Governance or with direct client contact. This is a confidential process which will be carried out before an offer of employment is made to a preferred applicant. To enable this to occur, applicants must provide proof of identity and sign a consent form.


This page last updated 16 July 2019

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