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Together we inform, support and educate.
We are a not-for-profit charity started by the hepatitis community.

Together we inform, support and educate.

Over 100,000* people have already been treated for hep C – will this be your year?

* Monitoring hepatitis C treatment uptake in Australia –Kirby Institute, Issue #12, 2022

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Over 100,000* people have already been treated for hep C – will this be your year?
Call NSW Infoline 1800 803 990

Call NSW Infoline 1800 803 990

Speak to a member of our hepatitis Infoline team via either phone call or online with live chat.

Call or Chat

Common questions about hepatitis

Find answers to some of the most common questions about hepatitis C and hepatitis B

View all information and resources

What is hepatitis C?

Hep C is an easily cured viral infection. It is passed on when blood from someone who has hep C gets into the bloodstream of someone else. For more information, call the Hepatitis Infoline on 1800 803 990 >>

What causes hepatitis C?

Hep C is passed on through blood-to-blood contact. Blood from someone who has hep C must get into the bloodstream of someone else. In Australia, this occurs mainly when people inject drugs, or through tattooing or body piercing. For more information, call the Hepatitis Infoline on 1800 803 990 >>

What are the symptoms of hepatitis C?

There are usually no symptoms. In a small number of cases, people might feel sick when they first catch hep C. It would be like the symptoms of hep B.

Click here for more information on hep C symptoms >>

For more information, call the Hepatitis Infoline on 1800 803 990 >>

Is hepatitis C curable?

Yes, very good new treatments are now available to everyone in Australia who has hep C.* Treatments give a 95% chance of cure (getting rid of your hep C). They have few side effects, are pills and don’t involve injections, and only last for 12 weeks (generally). For more information, call the Hepatitis Infoline on 1800 803 990 >>

*Cures are available to people who have a Medicare Card or Health Care Concession Card and who aren’t hospital inpatients.

What is Hepatitis B?

Hep B is a viral infection that affects the liver. Most adults recover from the infection. Most babies develop life-long infection (called chronic hep B). With life-long infection, chronic hep B can lead to serious liver problems. Talk to a doctor or the Hepatitis Infoline for more information. 1800 803 990 >>

What are the signs and symptoms of hepatitis B?

People who catch hep B might have symptoms within the first six-months. These include:

  • fatigue
  • weight loss
  • feeling like you have a flu
  • dark urine
  • jaundice

Those people who have hep B longer than 6-months (called chronic hep B) don’t have any symptoms. If they do have symptoms, they include:

  • tiredness, depression and irritability
  • pain in the liver (upper, right side of abdomen)
  • nausea and vomiting
  • loss of appetite
  • joint aches and pains

Click here for more information on hep B and hep C symptoms >>

For more information, talk to a doctor or call the Hepatitis Infoline 1800 803 990 >>

Should I be vaccinated for hepatitis B?

Consider being vaccinated for hep B if you are:

  • a person who injects drugs
  • a man who has sex with men
  • have sex with someone with hepatitis B
  • in household contact with someone who has hepatitis B
  • on haemodialysis
  • someone with HIV or impaired immunity
  • have some other type of liver disease
  • someone with a clotting disorder
  • waiting for a liver transplant
  • traveling to countries where hepatitis B is endemic
  • adopting children from overseas who have hepatitis B
  • going to be in prison

Consider being vaccinated for hep B if you work as:

  • a sex worker
  • a staff-member in a facility for people with intellectual disabilities
  • a juvenile justice or prison worker
  • a healthcare worker, ambulance personnel, dentist, embalmer, tattooist or body-piercer
  • a police officer, member of the armed forces or emergency services worker
  • a funeral worker (or other worker who has regular contact with human tissue, blood or body fluids and/or uses needles or syringes).

Talk to a doctor or the Hepatitis Infoline for more information. 1800 803 990 >>

About our impact
We work to improve the health and well-being of affected people and communities, and to prevent the transmission of viral hepatitis.

About our impact

We place affected communities at the heart of our work and will be transparent around demonstrating what changes we have been able to make through the work that we do.
3,457
people reached for testing and treatment
2,233
hours of peer worker engagements
1,143
people in custody talked with the Infoline
About Us

Our Impact

Explore our impact across 5 key project areas and 100’s of KPIs, all presented in convenient dashboards.

Strategic Plan and Board

Our Vision, Mission Statement & Values. For a world free of viral hepatitis

Some of our most read content

Explore some of our most consumed content across Hepatitis C, Hepatitis B and Liver Health

Hepatitis Stories

Hear first-hand from our communities about their experiences of hepatitis B and C.

Adam’s story: Living with hep B

Follow Adam’s personal story as he learns to live with hep B. This video is part of Hepatitis NSW’s Digital Storytelling Project. Other stories can be viewed here: 1. Julie’s story: Living with Hep B 2. Wei’s story: Living with hep B This video is part of Hepatitis NSW’s Digital Storytelling Project. This project is supported by a community grant under the Hepatitis B Community […]

Adam’s story: Living with hep B
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Challenges… I’ve had more than a few!

Jarra, one of our Community Peer Workers, has written a guest blog post about her experience of living with and being cured of, hepatitis C.

Challenges… I’ve had more than a few!
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Even a gentle brook can hit rocks – Kin’s hep B story

Kin lives in Sydney with his wife and three children. He has written here about his life lived with hepatitis B, the effect it had on his liver, and how continual monitoring saved him from a potentially devastating health outcome.

Even a gentle brook can hit rocks – Kin’s hep B story
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Feeling better is the new normal after hep C treatment

Gren, one of our Community Peer Speakers, has written a guest blog post about his experience of living with and being cured of, hepatitis C.

Feeling better is the new normal after hep C treatment
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Hep C can be cured: DAVE

In this video, we asked Dave about his experience with hep c and what it was like to be cured with the new, highly effective treatments. In this video, we cover the following questions with Dave: Were you ever on the old interferon treatment? (0:04) How was the new hep C treatment for you? (0:20) […]

Hep C can be cured: DAVE
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