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Hepatitis B transmission

Hepatitis B transmission

Hepatitis B transmission

The hepatitis B virus can live in blood and sexual fluids. Hepatitis B can be a risk if there is blood-to-blood contact with someone with hepatitis B. Unprotected sex can also be a transmission risk for hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B can’t be passed on through saliva, skin, or air – so these are not transmission risks for hepatitis B. When a mother with hepatitis B gives birth to a baby, she should wait to breastfeed until her baby has had its first hepatitis B injections in the hospital (hep B immunoglobulin and the first of 4 hep B vaccinations). After this breastmilk is not a transmission risk.

How do you get hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B can be passed on through blood-to-blood contact, unprotected sex or from mother to baby (at birth).

Transmission risks for hepatitis B are:

Hepatitis B is NOT transmitted by kissing, sneezing, hugging or coughing. You also won’t get hepatitis B if you eat food or drink beverages prepared by someone who has it. Without direct contact with blood or sexual fluids from the person with hepatitis B, you are not at risk of hepatitis B.

Groups at high risk of hepatitis B transmission

Hepatitis B can only be passed on through blood-to-blood contact, unprotected sex or during birth – so you might be at risk of having hepatitis B if you:

What should you do if you think you have hepatitis B?

If you think you might be at risk for hepatitis B, there are many ways we can help you. We can offer you support, answer questions and help you find health services near you:

How can I prevent hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B is only passed on through blood-to-blood contact, sexual fluids and from mother to baby at birth. The best way to avoid hepatitis B is to get vaccinated. You can be vaccinated at doctors’ clinics or sexual health clinics.

For more information about hepatitis B transmission, please contact the Hepatitis Infoline, download one of our free hepatitis B resources, or speak to your local doctor.

Find clinics and doctors in NSW

Find local clinics and specialists in NSW who can help you with Hepatitis treatment and care.

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Click here to check out the current hep B awareness campaign >>

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