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Hepatitis B was no barrier to having a baby

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Hep B no barrier to having a baby

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Amanda, one of our Hepatitis Speakers, has written a guest blog post about her experience of living with hepatitis B. 한국어로 읽기

I did not understand what effect hepatitis B would have on the rest of my life

I first found out that I had hepatitis B when I was a student at high school in South Korea. Since I was only then a teenager, I did not understand what effect hepatitis B would have on the rest of my life. At that time, hep B information was not well disseminated to people in my country, so my family vaguely thought it had to do with having unhealthy livers. Unfortunately, it was much worse than that and, because of hepatitis B, I lost my grandmother, my aunt and, finally, my father.

I didn’t know much about the virus or how it was transmitted

After school, I went to college and studied Early Childhood Education. Although I was able to complete the course, it was believed there was a possibility my hep B virus could be transmitted to children, and I was not able to become a kindergarten teacher. This was very upsetting, and I had to find a different kind of work. After much searching, I discovered I was interested in – and good at – baking, so I eventually got a job in a bakery. Even so, I was still worried about transmitting hepatitis B. As I mentioned, I didn’t know much about the virus or how it was passed on, and I was concerned about making and handling food. If only I’d known then what I know now, I would not have worried as much!

I worried a lot and feared that my baby might also get hepatitis B

A few years later, I moved to Australia, met my loved one here, got married and, last year, had a beautiful son.

While I was expecting, I worried a lot and feared that the baby might also get my hepatitis. Fortunately, the hospital staff knew better. They gave me special care, continuously monitoring and managing my hep B, along with my pregnancy.

On the day my son came into the world, the midwife and the nurse put him, still covered in blood, on my stomach so he could feel my warm skin. But I screamed at them “Don’t you know I have hep B? Please go and give him his injection right now!” I needn’t have panicked though. They explained the first immunoglobulin injection, for a newborn baby of a mum with hepatitis B, can be done within the first 12 hours. After I spent a short while with my little boy, the nurses took him, washed him and gave him the injection. It was then I was happily able to hold him in my arms.

A baby who has a mum with hepatitis B will need a total of four vaccine injections

Raising a baby has not been easy. The doctor has told me that even a mum with hepatitis B can breastfeed her baby, but I have still been a little nervous while breastfeeding him. I am most mindful of blood. When I had a wound once, I put my son far away from me and treated my bleeding carefully.

A baby who has a mum with hepatitis B will need a total of four hepatitis B vaccine injections. At birth, then in six weeks, in four months and, finally, in six months. My son has finished all four but has not yet been tested for antibodies as he is not one year old. I am optimistic that his body has generated antibodies and immunity against hepatitis B since we have done everything we needed to. We are waiting for good news, but I cannot help but still be a bit anxious.

Because I am raising a baby, I have become more cautious about others too. I know that I cannot pass on hep B through casual contact, but I now ask parents of babies about vaccinations and hep B status. I do not want them thinking or saying that their child could get hep B from me.

I am proud to see my son grow up healthy

I am proud to see my son grow up healthy and without any major problems. I will make sure that I have regular monitoring of my liver every six months and am hopeful of a long healthy life with my loving family.

For any person living with hepatitis B, I would say to them that you can monitor your liver function every six months. You will only ever have to take medication for hep B if recommended. By doing this you can live as well as people without the virus. It is good for your peace of mind!

Published 20 May, 2020

Amanda has excitedly notified us that her one year old son now has antibodies against hepatitis B. That means he is immune to hep B for life. Congratulations, Amanda and your son! Your vigilance and proper knowledge has paid off!
[25 May, 2020]

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